December 11, 2009

Hyun Jin Moon Calls for One Family Under God at Global Peace Festival in Washington

Posted in Charitable tagged at 7:47 am by hyunjinmoon

The grounds of the U.S. Capitol, the seat of American democracy and scene of numerous historic marches and gatherings, served as the setting for the U.S.A. Global Peace Festival (GPF), where a diverse crowd including American civil rights icons and Grammy Award-winning entertainers assembled in August in support of worldwide interfaith harmony.

“The great thing about the festival is that it brings people together with neighbors from other faiths and cultures in a safe encounter,” said event director Paul Murray, Pastor of the Apostolic Lighthouse Church in Baltimore.  “When people see Muslims and Jews from Jerusalem and other trouble spots embracing each other in tears of forgiveness and reconciliation on the stage, they naturally reach out right away to those of other faiths in the crowd.”

Dr. Joseph Lowery, former head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and close colleague of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., from the podium recalled King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered just a short distance away at the Lincoln Memorial.  Invoking the memory of King’s death, he called on GPF participants to create a new movement that would bring King’s vision of peace to the global stage, and referred to participants as the “Joshua Generation,” a term based on the biblical story of how Joshua’s generation led the Israelites into the Promised Land.

“We believe that 40 years is long enough to wander in the wilderness,” said Lowery.  “We must become the Joshua Generation that Martin envisioned, leading the world into a promised land as one family under God.”

Former congressman and civil rights leader Walter Fauntroy, an aide to Dr. King and the principal organizer of King’s historic march on Washington in 1963, electrified the crowd by identifying King’s “dream” with the growing global movement for peace that brought people of all faiths to the National Mall.

“There are those who say we are dreaming if we bring religious leaders together in the cause of peace,” he said.  “They say you are dreaming if you think you can solve the problems of poverty, war, injustice, and hatred. That’s what they said to Martin Luther King in Birmingham.  But we marched until we made that dream a reality.  We’re tired of the wilderness of terror and hatred.  And beginning on this day we are launching a global movement to end the barbarism of war, the decadence of racism, and the scourge of poverty.”

Keynote speaker and international GPF president Dr. Hyun Jin Moon told the crowd that “God’s blessings for this country were not for this nation alone, but were meant for all people of the world.”

“America was founded on the principles of the Declaration of Independence,” he said. “This was a secular document but carried profound spiritual authority.  It invited all to come and worship freely in this country. The principles of the Declaration, the dream of religious freedom and human rights grounded in recognition of God is the inheritance of all the world’s peoples.”

Like previous GPF festivals held around the world, Washington’s GPF was preceded by local community outreach and service initiatives conducted in partnership with prominent non-profits and area civic organizations.

Service is just another way of saying ‘I love you,'” said Rev. Mark Farr of the Points of Light Institute.  The Institute, Boys and Girls Clubs of Washington D.C., and more than 242 partner organizations coordinated a citywide day of service.  “Food for Peace” helped fill the shelves of the Capitol Area Food Bank, which had recently revealed that thousands of additional families in the area had become vulnerable to hunger.  Festival attendees brought food from as far away as Chicago.

In another initiative, the Points of Light Foundation worked with area youth to register “a million acts of kindness and service.”

“We do unto others as we would have them do unto us,” said organizer Archbishop George Augustus Stallings. “A million acts of service and kindness may not seem to be associated with peace, but they are the seeds of peace. They make us more compassionate.”

Thousands of children in attendance from more than 25 countries – including refugees from Bosnia and Serbia – expressed a “longing for peace” through the “Children’s Cloth of Many Colors,” a creative work arising from their experiences in societies disrupted by war.

“There’s a purity to the quilt, a vulnerability and an innocence,” said project founder Gerry Eitner.  “It’s the soft, powerful love of children that gives the quilt its amazing power of transformation.  Personal miracles have happened around it before…  Each child has enveloped their cloth with feelings of what peace on Earth would be like for them, and the sweetness and beauty of their creations can be overwhelming.”

Dr. Moon, who holds degrees from Columbia University and the Harvard Business School, founded the Global Peace Festival and other organizations with the objectives of reducing poverty and mitigating conflicts between nations.

“Without a spiritual root, fundamental human rights will continue to be abused,” he said. “Today, true interfaith work means not just tolerance and a willingness to sit together and listen, but a celebration of the essential values that are shared among faiths.  Let us make a solemn pledge to expand the American dream to the whole world, so that all peoples may join together as one family under God.”

Washington, D.C.’s Global Peace Festival was one of 20 events held in 2008 that attracted more than 1 million people committed to a worldwide vision of peace and interfaith harmony.
The grounds of the U.S. Capitol, the seat of American democracy and scene of numerous historic marches and gatherings, served as the setting for the U.S.A. Global Peace Festival (GPF), where a diverse crowd including American civil rights icons and Grammy Award-winning entertainers assembled in August in support of worldwide interfaith harmony.

“The great thing about the festival is that it brings people together with neighbors from other faiths and cultures in a safe encounter,” said event director Paul Murray, Pastor of the Apostolic Lighthouse Church in Baltimore.  “When people see Muslims and Jews from Jerusalem and other trouble spots embracing each other in tears of forgiveness and reconciliation on the stage, they naturally reach out right away to those of other faiths in the crowd.”

Dr. Joseph Lowery, former head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and close colleague of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., from the podium recalled King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech delivered just a short distance away at the Lincoln Memorial.  Invoking the memory of King’s death, he called on GPF participants to create a new movement that would bring King’s vision of peace to the global stage, and referred to participants as the “Joshua Generation,” a term based on the biblical story of how Joshua’s generation led the Israelites into the Promised Land.

“We believe that 40 years is long enough to wander in the wilderness,” said Lowery.  “We must become the Joshua Generation that Martin envisioned, leading the world into a promised land as one family under God.”

Former congressman and civil rights leader Walter Fauntroy, an aide to Dr. King and the principal organizer of King’s historic march on Washington in 1963, electrified the crowd by identifying King’s “dream” with the growing global movement for peace that brought people of all faiths to the National Mall.

“There are those who say we are dreaming if we bring religious leaders together in the cause of peace,” he said.  “They say you are dreaming if you think you can solve the problems of poverty, war, injustice, and hatred. That’s what they said to Martin Luther King in Birmingham.  But we marched until we made that dream a reality.  We’re tired of the wilderness of terror and hatred.  And beginning on this day we are launching a global movement to end the barbarism of war, the decadence of racism, and the scourge of poverty.”

Keynote speaker and international GPF president Dr. Hyun Jin Moon told the crowd that “God’s blessings for this country were not for this nation alone, but were meant for all people of the world.”

“America was founded on the principles of the Declaration of Independence,” he said. “This was a secular document but carried profound spiritual authority.  It invited all to come and worship freely in this country. The principles of the Declaration, the dream of religious freedom and human rights grounded in recognition of God is the inheritance of all the world’s peoples.”

Like previous GPF festivals held around the world, Washington’s GPF was preceded by local community outreach and service initiatives conducted in partnership with prominent non-profits and area civic organizations.

Service is just another way of saying ‘I love you,'” said Rev. Mark Farr of the Points of Light Institute.  The Institute, Boys and Girls Clubs of Washington D.C., and more than 242 partner organizations coordinated a citywide day of service.  “Food for Peace” helped fill the shelves of the Capitol Area Food Bank, which had recently revealed that thousands of additional families in the area had become vulnerable to hunger.  Festival attendees brought food from as far away as Chicago.

In another initiative, the Points of Light Foundation worked with area youth to register “a million acts of kindness and service.”

“We do unto others as we would have them do unto us,” said organizer Archbishop George Augustus Stallings. “A million acts of service and kindness may not seem to be associated with peace, but they are the seeds of peace. They make us more compassionate.”

Thousands of children in attendance from more than 25 countries – including refugees from Bosnia and Serbia – expressed a “longing for peace” through the “Children’s Cloth of Many Colors,” a creative work arising from their experiences in societies disrupted by war.

“There’s a purity to the quilt, a vulnerability and an innocence,” said project founder Gerry Eitner.  “It’s the soft, powerful love of children that gives the quilt its amazing power of transformation.  Personal miracles have happened around it before…  Each child has enveloped their cloth with feelings of what peace on Earth would be like for them, and the sweetness and beauty of their creations can be overwhelming.”

Dr. Moon, who holds degrees from Columbia University and the Harvard Business School, founded the Global Peace Festival and other organizations with the objectives of reducing poverty and mitigating conflicts between nations.

“Without a spiritual root, fundamental human rights will continue to be abused,” he said. “Today, true interfaith work means not just tolerance and a willingness to sit together and listen, but a celebration of the essential values that are shared among faiths.  Let us make a solemn pledge to expand the American dream to the whole world, so that all peoples may join together as one family under God.”

Washington, D.C.’s Global Peace Festival was one of 20 events held in 2008 that attracted more than 1 million people committed to a worldwide vision of peace and interfaith harmony.

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: